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Article 18: Product identifiers

1.  The label shall include details permitting the identification of the substance or mixture (hereinafter referred to as ‘product identifiers’).
The term used for identification of the substance or mixture shall be the same as that used in the safety data sheet drawn up in accordance with Article 31 of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 (hereinafter referred to as ‘safety data sheet’), without prejudice to Article 17(2) of this Regulation.
2.  The product identifier for a substance shall consist of at least the following:
(a) if the substance is included in Part 3 of Annex VI, a name and an identification number as given therein;
(b) if the substance is not included in Part 3 of Annex VI, but appears in the classification and labelling inventory, a name and an identification number as given therein;
(c) if the substance is not included in Part 3 of Annex VI nor in the classification and labelling inventory, the number provided by the CAS (hereinafter referred to as ‘the CAS number’), together with the name set out in the nomenclature provided by the IUPAC (hereinafter referred to as ‘the IUPAC Nomenclature’), or the CAS number together with another international chemical name(s); or
(d) if the CAS number is not available, the name set out in the IUPAC Nomenclature or another international chemical name(s).
Where the name in the IUPAC nomenclature exceeds 100 characters, one of the other names (usual name, trade name, abbreviation) referred to in section 2.1.2 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 may be used provided that the notification in accordance with Article 40 includes both the name set out in the IUPAC Nomenclature and the other name used.
3.  The product identifier for a mixture shall consist of both of the following:
(a) the trade name or the designation of the mixture;
(b) the identity of all substances in the mixture that contribute to the classification of the mixture as regards acute toxicity, skin corrosion or serious eye damage, germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, respiratory or skin sensitisation, specific target organ toxicity (STOT) or aspiration hazard.
Where, in the case referred to in (b), that requirement leads to the provision of multiple chemical names, a maximum of four chemical names shall suffice, unless more than four names are needed to reflect the nature and the severity of the hazards.
The chemical names selected shall identify the substances primarily responsible for the major health hazards which have given rise to the classification and the choice of the corresponding hazard statements.