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explanations of column headings: Explanations of column headings

Substances:

The name corresponds to the International Chemical Identification used for the substance in Part 3 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures, amending and repealing Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC, and amending Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006.
Whenever possible, substances are designated by their IUPAC names. Substances listed in Einecvs (European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances), Elincs (European List of Notified Substances) or the list of ‘No-longer-polymers’ are designated using the names in these lists. Other names, such as usual or common names, are included in some cases. Whenever possible, plant protection products and biocides are designated by their ISO names.

Entries for groups of substances:

A number of group entries are included in Part 3 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008. In these cases, the classification requirements will apply to all substances covered by the description.
In some cases, there are classification requirements for specific substances that would be covered by the group entry. In such cases a specific entry is included in Part 3 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 for the substance and the group entry will be annotated with the phrase ‘except those specified elsewhere in Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008’.
In some cases, individual substances may be covered by more than one group entry. In these cases, the classification of the substance reflects the classification for each of the two group entries. In cases where different classifications for the same hazard are given, the most severe classification will be applied.

Index number:

The Index number is the identification code given to the substance in Part 3 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008. Substances are listed in the Appendix according to this index number.

EC numbers:

The EC number, i.e. Einecs, Elincs or NLP, is the official number of the substance within the European Union. The Einecs number can be obtained from the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substance (Einecs). The Elincs number can be obtained from the European List of Notified Substances. The NLP number can be obtained from the list of ‘No-longer-polymers’. These lists are published by the Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.
The EC number is a seven-digit system of the type XXX-XXX-X which starts at 200-001-8 (Einecs), at 400-010-9 (Elincs) and at 500-001-0 (NLP). This number is indicated in the column entitled ‘EC No’.

CAS number:

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers have been defined for substances to help in their identification.

Notes:

The full text of the notes can be found in Part 1 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008.
The notes to be taken into account for the purposes of this Regulation are the following:

Note A:

Without prejudice to Article 17(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008, the name of the substance must appear on the label in the form of one of the designations given in Part 3 of Annex VI to that Regulation.

In that Part, use is sometimes made of a general description such as ‘… compounds’ or ‘… salts’. In this case, the supplier who places such a substance on the market is required to state on the label the correct name, due account being taken of Section 1.1.1.4 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008.

Note B:

Some substances (acids, bases, etc.) are placed on the market in aqueous solutions at various concentrations and, therefore, these solutions require different classification and labelling since the hazards vary at different concentrations.

Note C:

Some organic substances may be marketed either in a specific isomeric form or as a mixture of several isomers.

Note D:

Certain substances which are susceptible to spontaneous polymerisation or decomposition are generally placed on the market in a stabilised form. It is in this form that they are listed in Part 3 of Annex VI to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008.

However, such substances are sometimes placed on the market in a non-stabilised form. In this case, supplier who places such a substance on the market must state on the label the name of the substance followed by the words ‘non-stabilised’.

Note J:

The classification as a carcinogen or mutagen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains less than 0,1 % w/w benzene (EC No 200-753-7).

Note K:

The classification as a carcinogen or mutagen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains less than 0,1 % w/w 1,3-butadiene (EC No 203-450-8).

Note L:

The classification as a carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains less than 3 % DMSO extract as measured by IP 346.

Note M:

The classification as a carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains less than 0,005 % w/w benzo[a]-pyrene (EC No 200-028-5).

Note N:

The classification as a carcinogen need not apply if the full refining history is known and it can be shown that the substance from which it is produced is not a carcinogen.

Note P:

The classification as a carcinogen or mutagen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains less than 0,1 % w/w benzene (EC No 200-753-7).

Note R:

The classification as a carcinogen need not apply to fibres with a length weighted geometric mean diameter, less two standard errors, greater than 6μm.